Honza Zamojski / Trojan Home / Turf Projects, Croydon, Londyn, 4-26.11.2016


Trojan Home

There was a war. A total war. A chaotic war set in the background. The conflict, whose birth few people still remember, ultimately became a permanent physical value, something like an additional time vector (past – present – future – war) or previously unknown property of a solid figure (height x width x length x war). The presence of war has become so common and mundane that a special button on calculators, cash registers, scales and other computing devices was introduced (laid down in the Decree-Law). This special button included to the result of the given equation the potential and likely consequences of the ongoing conflict. To this day, nobody have succeeded in identifying the names of analysts, who developed the mathematical script.

At some point, people stopped talking about the surrounding landscapes “a beautiful historic city”, “vast agricultural areas,” “the closest planet with the Earth-like atmosphere.” Phrases such as “bombed/ survived city”, “looted/ untouched fields”, “hospitable/ hostile planet” entered with a big bang the literary language and the vernacular and made themselves at home. Every word, every sentence, every article and a short story became a small, and ultimately rather meaningless footnote to the Great Narrative of Conflict. The heroes and the leaders very quickly changed places with the traitors and the enemies of the nation. Victims rose from the nameless graves in order to hop on a hastily built concrete pedestals of new statues and monuments. A strange time has come, later named by reasonable historians as the Ghostism Era.

No one knows, who started the so-called peace process. Some speak of a secret group of hackers and others about “lone wolves” attacking the key positions of the rocket launchers of the feuding parties. Still others trace the conspiracy of the masters of the world who just for fun unleashed hell, and for the pleasure they offered long desired truce to the lesser race. But, does it really matter? Probably not.